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Stuck In The Middle With You*

02 Aug

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We don’t like to discuss social class, period. Perhaps it’s a relic from our British independence. When Americans talk about class what we’re really talking about is money. We believe that if you have a place to live and that place is not a castle, you are middle-class. Everyone is middle-class; it’s like being above average. For some the designation is a badge of honor, for others it’s a disingenuous humility. Periodically an elected official or government agency will declare what the economic threshold is for middle-class. Sometimes they even include the ceiling on the perimeter. It really doesn’t matter as everyone wants to call themselves middle-class.

What we deign to call ourselves is hardly significant. Clearly it’s important to us, but doubtful that it’s important to anyone else. Introduce yourself at parties as a stay-at-home actress/scrapbooker/snackatarian and note how quickly the interviewer resumes talking about themselves. When classifications matter is when they’re used to make larger points or policy. By viewing economic class as an ideal rather than a reality we risk working against our own best interests. Recently we’ve begun to embrace discussing the economic upper-class; we now call them the 1%. But we still shy from identifying or discussing the working-class. During the most recent presidential election we used terms such as “working families” which is close, but mostly just conjures child labor. We also have started using the term “working-poor” which has more to do with a livable wage and full-time employment opportunities than an economic class. There are wage, tax, healthcare and many other public policies that potentially affect the working class more than any other group.

It’s not that surprising that we’ve evolved to this point. There was a time when we discussed class irrespective of income. People came from a working-class background, or they were middle or upper-class. However, we used the terms with hushed voices and a bit of self-consciousness. We are a culture obsessed with the outcomes of these delineations but hesitate to discuss the cause. We spend a great deal of time trying to make our country abide by social middle-class values but don’t label them as such. (Ironically the United Kingdom, the mother ship of the class system, views middle-class values as something to be avoided.) It’s interesting that in a society that enjoys talking about the melting pot, diversity and inclusion, we feel rather strongly that everyone should really embrace the same values. It’s why we all identify as middle-class. Americans are averse to the social class system (but we do obsess about the Royal family. It’s all so confusing this relationship we have with the homeland.) We see class not as static, as do our friends across the pond, but as something we transcend. We are a pull yourself up by the bootstrap kinda country. Where you’re born in not where you are to stay (unless it’s at the top.) Therefore when we talk about class we tinge it with aspiration. It’s like calling someone a “bride-to-be” or “rising senior.” It’s about where you’re going not where you are.

But what you call yourself and how you see yourself are two different things. How you identify, at a party or elsewhere, is immaterial, but it matters a great deal politically. Too many of us support candidates and parties who are most definitely working against our best interest because we want to identify with them. Some candidates intentionally make themselves very relatable to the working-class but are no friend to the policies that (disproportionally) affect the group. There is an old adage that you should dress for the job you want (not the one you have.) When it comes to voting; you should vote for where you are, not where you hope to be.

*Stealers Wheel (1972)

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2 Comments

Posted by on August 2, 2013 in Cultural Critique

 

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2 responses to “Stuck In The Middle With You*

  1. zoetakingthefield

    August 5, 2013 at 9:19 am

    I’ve always thought it weird how virtually all Americans call themselves middle-class. But then class is weird, I probably regard myself as working class because I’m poor and come from a poor background, but I am well educated and have a non-manual (but poorly paid) occupation. I also perhaps have a bit of a chip on my shoulder, my Mum was a teacher, but a single Mum with three kids so we were quite poor and lived in a poor area but had lots of books in the house and were relatively well spoken – a lot of the other kids picked on me for being ‘posh’ so I probably started identifying myself as extra working class as a defence mechanism and effort to fit it and it’s never really gone away.

     
    • brendatobias

      August 5, 2013 at 1:38 pm

      I grew up in a home w/ tons of books & not a whole lot of money. I’ve always considered social class to be defined by a set of shared values. It’s certainly less quantifiable than economic class, but equally meaningful. I believe (& feel free to disagree) that one can belong to one level of social class & a different level of economic class. I find it so interesting that we have become a “Look at me!” & “I’m so special” culture while also wanting to identify as the (middle-class) majority.

       

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